Project 1: Exercise 2.1

Find a scene that has depth. From a fixed position, take a sequence of five or six shots at different focal lengths without changing your viewpoint. (You might like to use the specific focal lengths indicated on the lens barrel.)
As you page through the shots on the preview screen it almost feels as though you’re moving through the scene. So the ability to change focal lengths has an obvious use: rather than physically moving towards or away from your subject, the lens can do it for you. The other immediate difference between the shots is the ‘angle of view’, which also depends on the sensor size of your camera. Use the sequence to try to get a feeling for how the angle of view corresponds to the different focal lengths for your particular camera and lens combination. Which shot in the sequence feels closest to the angle of view of your normal vision?
Does zooming in from a fixed viewpoint change the appearance of things? If you enlarge and compare individual elements within the first and last shots, you can see that their ‘perspective geometry’ is exactly the same. To change the way things actually look, a change in focal length needs to be combined with a change in viewpoint.

18mm
18mm
24mm
24mm
35mm
35mm
50mm
50mm
70mm
70mm

Looking through the shots and revisiting the site I felt that 24mm and 35mm photos felt closer to what I believe to be equal to what my eye could see, this surprised me as I originally thought 50mm focal setting was closer to the human eye. After a bit investigative work I found the crop sensor on my Nikon D5600 and the distortion of the telephoto 18mm – 200mm lens the 35mm focal length equates to 53mm.

Does the geometry of objects change whilst zooming, no. After cropping and comparing the images they remained identical no matter which photo I cropped.

Equipment to use:
Nikon D5600 shooting RAW images only using aperture priority mode as per the brief
Nikon 18-200mm telephoto lens
Remote Shutter Trigger
Tripod

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